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what is curing in textile printing?

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SrinivasanChief Party Member
Co-Founder of KnitBrain International.

Curing consists of baking a garment or garment section in a heated chamber to either set creases in the fabric permanently or to decompose auxiliary media used as a sewing aid. For example, curing permanently sets previously pressed creases in certain permanent press, durable press, and wash and wear garments. Curing decomposes the backing material used for facilitating20 the embroidering in certain embroidered garments.

(Chemical Finishing) A process carried out after the application of a finish to a textile fabric in which appropriate conditions are used to effect a chemical reaction. Usually, the fabric is heat-treated for several minutes. However, it may be subject to higher temperatures for short times (flash curing) or too low temperatures for longer periods and at higher regain (moist curing).

A baking process with the use of resin finishes, applying heat under carefully controlled conditions to a fabric or the garment, which cause a reaction in the finishing agents and make them work. Crease-retention, water repellency, wrinkle resistance, and durable press are examples of finishes that are cured.

a) A process that follows the addition of a finish to a textile fabric and in which appropriate conditions are used to effect a chemical reaction.

NOTE:

Heat treatment for several minutes is common, but higher temperatures for short times and high moisture regain (moist curing) are also used.

b) The vulcanization of rubber, whether by the application of heat or by passing through cold sulphuryl chloride solution (cold cure).